Catch John on the PAPA Net

The PAPA System (http://www.papasys.com/) has invited me to participate on their net this Thursday the 7th on D-PLUS REF012C at 8PM Pacific (0300Z).

Apparently there is a lot of discussion about the UDR56K in Southern California.

I will be giving a general overview of the genesis, technology, and applications for the UDR56K, followed by a Q&A for net check-ins.

Since this will be “on the air” over amateur radio, I will not be able to provide any responses to questions related to sales or support.

The net can be accessed for check-in on REF012C. REF012 is also available as an audio feed at http://www.radioreference.com/apps/audio/?action=wp&feedId=5429

6 Responses to Catch John on the PAPA Net

  1. K6DPY-Dan says:

    I don’t have D-Star capability, but I have only one question (two parts)

    What would it take for Ham radios to catch up to the LTE data speeds of recent smartphones? In how many years?

    • nwdi0786 says:

      It’s not going to happen.

      Cellphone/Wireless Internet is a multi-billion dollar industry and as such has the means to develop and deploy both the infrastructure and the IC development for their products.

      At best amateurs can deploy cell technology when it happens to be adaptable to their bands like HSMM.

      At the same time they have their eyes on and wallets out to gobble up spectrum.

  2. K6DPY-Dan says:

    I don’t have D-Star capability, but I have only one question (two parts)

    What would it take for Ham radios to catch up to the LTE data speeds of recent smartphones? In how many years?

    • nwdi0786 says:

      It’s not going to happen.

      Cellphone/Wireless Internet is a multi-billion dollar industry and as such has the means to develop and deploy both the infrastructure and the IC development for their products.

      At best amateurs can deploy cell technology when it happens to be adaptable to their bands like HSMM.

      At the same time they have their eyes on and wallets out to gobble up spectrum.

  3. K6DPY-Dan says:

    Clear Wire decided to change strategy from WiMax to LTE. I wonder how many WiMax radios are now surplus which can be switched to ham use?

    Current cell technology is going after speed. Amateur radio is distance communications. Two different objectives. At some point in the future one would think speed would level off, and when it does I wonder if digital amateur radio can be more relevant to the masses? (Or will it have been left in the dust?)

  4. K6DPY-Dan says:

    Clear Wire decided to change strategy from WiMax to LTE. I wonder how many WiMax radios are now surplus which can be switched to ham use?

    Current cell technology is going after speed. Amateur radio is distance communications. Two different objectives. At some point in the future one would think speed would level off, and when it does I wonder if digital amateur radio can be more relevant to the masses? (Or will it have been left in the dust?)