NW Digital Radio Blog page 5

John Speaks on DV Modes at MicroHams

MicroHAMS UDRX-440 Update

WinDV Configuration

When you run WinDV (DV Node for Windows), for the first time you need to configure it for the ThumbDV. Make sure you have the latest version from DutchStar with support for the ThumbDV.

Select Tools-Options

Screenshot 2015-05-22 13.58.43

 

  • Select ThumbDV as your “RF Device”
  • Select the COM Port that the ThumbDV is connected to
    • Check Device Manager for “USB Serial Port”
  • Baud Rate must be 230400 for original ThumbDV, 460800 for Model A
  • Enter your Callsign
    • Callsign is used for connection to gateways. An A,B, or C is required to connect to DExtra  Reflectors (XRFxxx)
    • Auth Call is used with US Trust Registration to connect to DPLUS Reflectors (REFxxx)
    • Callsign / is used for ID
  • Configure the Sound Card to use your desired input and output
  • Select a Callsign Server.  DUTCH*Star and Free*Star provide additional reflectors.  If the server is down select another.

The default Tools-Settings will provide basic operation and don’t require any changes.

Close then restart WinDV

WinDV

The ThumbDV Status should be RUNNING and the Version is read from the AMBE3000 chip on the ThumbDV. If both of these are correct your ThumbDV is working properly.

Press XMIT, even if you are not connected to a Gateway, and the RED/GREEN LEDs on the ThumbDV will flash.

The ThumbDV is not connected to your network or sound system. If you are having difficulties with either of them, you need to trouble-shoot those as Windows System issues.

If you like WinDV make sure to donate to Fred!

UDRX Update

Dayton Hamvention 2015
Dennis recently completed the Software Defined Receiver for the UDRX-440.  It now goes to Basil for integration with our framework.

This is a complete general purpose software defined receiver with a socket interface to support multiple protocols.   AGC is implemented in hardware as there is no conventional FM limiter which would prevent us from implementing other modulations. The MSK receiver utilizes dual software PLLs to implement Mark and Space separately allowing us to track not only carrier error but frequency shift as well. Lock times for a 100Hz frequency error are on the order of 15 mSec or about one and a half characters at 9600, reducing training time for TX/RX switching. There is a separate debug socket for reporting modem state suitable for advanced diagnostics. The fixed point DSP receiver uses less than 10% of available CPU cycles.

When combined with the previously implemented software designed transmitter, we now have a complete SDR transceiver.

The transmitter PA is now running at full power and initial thermal evaluation shows that we have met our goal of 100% duty cycle in a 20C shack without a fan. A separate temp-controlled fan kit will be available for high ambient temperature, continuous duty applications. Spurious emissions are less than -60 dBc.

These are the last significant milestones for the UDRX. Once integration and characterization are complete we will move the UDRX into Pilot Production on the full manufacturing line for field testing.

If you are at Hamvention, please come by our booth (EH0515) and visit with Bryan and John — we are thrilled to have reached this point.

 

NWDR Guarantee, Warranty Policy

Dayton Hamvention represents our first anniversary of shipping products. First the DV3000 and more recently the ThumbDV™.

We stand behind all of our products and it’s time to explicitly state our policies.

If you are unhappy with your DV3000 or ThumbDV™ for any reason, we offer a 30 Day Money-Back Guarantee.

In addition we offer a 1 Year Limited Warranty against defects in materials or workmanship.

The full text can be found under the Support Menu.

Thanks for your support,
Bryan K7UDR

Introducing the UDRC

Universal Digital Radio Controller
–UPDATED–

Here at NW Digital Radio we are always looking at ways to enhance digital communications for the radio amateur. As we have been marching forward with the development of the UDRX-440 there have been a few products that have come to market both from us and from other manufacturers.

When designing the UDRX-440 we wanted to enable D-STAR voice communications and designed a daughter card to provide the AMBE vocoder. We choose the DVSI AMBE-3000™ chip which has the potential of providing superior voice reproduction on D-STAR, but also supports AMBE+2 which is used by other radio standards such as DMR, NXDN, Yaesu Fusion, APCO P25 Phase 2, … We created the DV3000, which is available as a standalone product along with the open source AMBEServer to make AMBE vocoding available over a network. This Raspberry Pi shield rapidly gained a following and hundreds are now deployed around the world. Later, we created a USB connected version of this device called the ThumbDV™, which has opened up AMBE vocoding to hundreds of additional users.

When Yaesu offered their new DR-1X Fusion repeater to clubs for $500  (updated information), the Northwest Digital Radio Club (not part of NW Digital Radio company) purchased one and put it on the air in Edmonds, WA as NW7DR.  The half rate digital voice is very good and the full rate voice is excellent. It wasn’t long before John (K7VE) looked at the external accessory adapter and wondered if the repeater could also do D-STAR. After considerable research and experimentation using a Raspberry Pi B+/2 for control and a DVRPTR V1 GMSK modem it was discovered that the DR-1X made an excellent D-STAR repeater. By comparison, John’s Kenwood based repeaters often run significant BER (bit error rate) on receive, at one location the Kenwood runs around 7+% BER, while the DR-1X is at 0%. (The repeaters are co-located and both use the DVRPTR V1.)

At first, the experiments ran into a known lockup condition when using an external controller in combination with Yaesu Fusion Digital mode. With the latest generation firmware the DR-1X is able to provide D-STAR, Analog, and Fusion Digital all on the same channel on a per transmission switched mode.  Mode control is accomplished using GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi.

NW Digital Radio looked at the Raspberry Pi control system and soon decided that a combination control board with integrated CODEC could be built as a hat for 40 PIN GPIO headers on the Raspberry Pi and thus is born the Universal Digital Radio Controller or UDRC.

With the addition of the UDRC, the DR-1X will operate in these configurations. (WIRES-X requires a Yaesu HRI-200 attached to an external radio)

  • With the latest 1.00 family of firmware on the DR-1X
    • D-STAR/Analog
  • With the latest 1.10 family (after December 2015) on the DR-1X
    • D-STAR/Analog
    • D-STAR/Digital Fusion
    • D-STAR/Digital Fusion/Analog

The UDRC does not transcode between D-STAR and Fusion, it allows the DR-1X to repeat D-STAR transmissions and use the ircDDBGateway to communicate with stations, linked reflectors and repeaters, STARnet Digital Groups, etc.  Analog, Digital Fusion, and D-STAR are switched at the repeater on a per transmission basis.

The UDRC is designed as a simple to install addition to the DR-1X, however, NW Digital Radio has kept the experimenter in mind by providing various headers to allow straightforward hardware modification for integration with other hardware and applications. The built-in CODEC also will be available via a amateur packet radio standard mini DIN-6 port for software developers to adapt other modes, e.g. Packet Radio, VOIP (Asterisk/IRLP/Echolink), Codec-2, … Additionally, all GPIO and audio pins are available as solder through pads.

Share your application ideas on the UDRC group.

Estimated price for the UDRC is $89.95

 

DMR / D-STAR Gateway

The Germans have done it again!

From the folks that brought us the ircDDB network, we hear from Hans-Jürgen Barthen, DL5DI, that there is now a gateway between D-STAR (DCS Gateways) and Hytera DMR Repeaters using the AMBEServer with either the PiDV™ or ThumbDV™.  This gateway is in use at a handful of DMR repeaters in Germany and Austria with systems soon to be implemented in Sweden and Switzerland.

You can download executables for the gateway and combine with the AMBEServer to create your own gateway. The software does D-STAR callsign to DMR radio ID mapping and transports audio between networks using the Hytera API.

Another step toward Universal Digital Radio from the community of amateur radio developers using products from NW Digital Radio.

 

ThumbDV™: AmateurLogic.TV Episode 77

Tommy Martin, N5ZNO, shares his experience with the ThumbDV™ on Episode 77

 

 

Manufacturing Reliability Data

We have now shipped over 300 PiDV™, and the ThumbDV™ will soon pass it for units delivered. There are currently 200 more units in process.

Out of the Box MFG, our local assembly house in Renton WA, does a great job on their SMT line which includes automated optical inspection or AOI. We physically tested all of the first 100 units and found 1 failure, which was attributed to a bad AMBE3000 IC, probably due to hot plugging the board during test.

At this point we stopped functional testing and now rely on AOI to flag any assembly issues for operator inspection or remedy. We have had one working unit returned as suspect but it turned out to be a failed R-Pi and the PiDV™ was returned to service with no charge to the customer.

I want to thank Chad, Paul, Brian and all of the people at Out of the Box for their hi-quality and reasonable cost assembly services.

Bryan – K7UDR

Statement of Origin:

The PiDV™ and ThumbDV™ are assembled in the USA by Out of the Box from globally manufactured components obtained thru Dig-Key and Mouser. The PCB Fabs are made in China.

 

ThumbDV™ Passes FCC Approval

Because the ThumbDV™ attaches to a computer using USB, it is clearly a “Computer Peripheral” as defined by the FCC and is required to meet the Part 15 Subpart B standard for conducted and radiated emissions.

We sent a sample unit to Nemko-CCL, an accredited test lab in Utah, and they performed testing to the following standards:

  • EU: EN5022:2010
  • USA: FCC Part 15, Subpart B
  • CAN: ICES-003, Issue 5
  • AUS/NZL: CISPR 22:2009

After passing all tests, a Declaration of Conformity was issued by Nemko-CCL and as of today all units are shipped with a sticker on the back.

ThumbDV Passes FCC 15b