NW Digital Radio Blog page 5

UDRC™ is now available for ORDER

The UDRC™ has been released to production. We will have stock at Dayton Hamvention, booth EH0515. $90 no shipping and we pay the sales tax.

For those of you who are interested, you may place an order now for delivery when we return from Dayton or come see us at SeaPAC in June.

Units will ship with EITHER the Mini DIN-6 OR HD-15 Cable, not both as indicated earlier.

Universal Digital Radio Controller

Universal Digital Radio Controller

UDRC: The Linux in the Ham Shack Interview

The good folks at the Linux in the Ham Shack podcast interviewed John (K7VE) about the UDRC and other topics.

The segment starts at minute 16:30 of podcast #166

UDRC Status

The UDRC Rev 2 is now operating in the field with our Beta sites. Rev 3 pilot run should be completed this week and, pending confirmation, we will release it to production next week and start accepting orders.

We’ll be demoing the various modes at Dayton Hamvention. Stop by and see us at Booth EH0515 right around the corner from Yaesu.

A Short UDRX and UDRC Update from MicroHAMS 2016

John Speaks at DCC 2015

Bryan Speaks at DCC 2015

Putting AMBEserver on the Internet

If you have a low latency and responsive Internet connection, you can place an AMBEserver directly on the Internet and access it remotely through Buster, DummyRepeater, or any other program that provides AMBEserver connectivity.

Raspberry Pi with PiDV and ThumbDV

Raspberry Pi with PiDV and ThumbDV

The first step is to connect a PiDV™ to the GPIO of a Raspberry Pi or a ThumbDV™ to the USB port of a computer which will run the AMBEserver.  A Raspberry Pi is more than sufficient for this task and provides an economical platform for AMBEserver, however, the choice of computer is up to you.  Follow the directions on this page (updated instructions on the wiki) for a Raspberry Pi build and configuration.

Once you have built your AMBEserver, verify that it is working with the included Python scripts, ‘ambesocktest.py’ will test the UDP socket, it returns the AMBE-3000 model number repetitively until killed (with control-C) if the daemon is functioning properly on port 2460.

On your local network, configure Buster or DummyRepeater to access the AMBEserver on the LAN IP address of your AMBEserver. When you have a working AMBEserver, then it is time to make it available outside your LAN.

Picture of Buster Preferences

Buster Preferences for AMBEserver

DummyRepeater Select AMBEserver

DummyRepeater Preferences for AMBEserver

Since there are a variety of routers/firewalls/modems that connect you to your ISP it is beyond the scope of this article to provide specific instructions, but all that is required is to forward an external port (default 2460) on your public IP to the LAN IP address of your AMBEserver (e.g. 192.168.0.5) at the designated port (default 2460).  You may want to choose a different UDP port in your AMBEserver and for your public facing IP address.  If you use the same port for both, then you most likely can configure Buster or DummyRepeater once for use at home and away by using your public IP address (replace the LAN IP address or Localhost IP Address).

Now take your Buster or DummyRepeater system to a remote location and test accessing AMBEserver over the Internet using your public IP address.

Update: The PiDV is not currently in production.  Check out BlueDV for Windows and BlueDV for Android at http://www.pa7lim.nl/bluedv — the latest BlueDV for Android can use AMBEserver.

Native MacOS Application for ThumbDV™ and PiDV™

 

 

Buster on App Store

 

Jeremy McDermond, NH6Z, undertook writing a native application for Mac OS® and it is now available on the  Mac App Store.

Buster is not a product of NW Digital Radio and support requests should go directly to Jeremy.

Jeremy has stated that the source code will be made publicly available via GitHub and he is open to collaboration for future versions.

It works with a ThumbDV™ on a Mac OS® USB port and with AMBEserver™, locally or over a network.  AMBEserver can support either the ThumbDV™ or PiDV™.

This application has been in beta for several months and is both stable and feature rich.  It takes advantage of several Mac OS® specific services.  For example, it will use Apple Core Location service to determine your current location and reports it via D-STAR.  It also provides mapping of remote stations who are reporting position.

There is one known issue:  The way that Mac OS® powers USB ports during its sleep state may cause communication issues with the the ThumbDV™ upon wake up.  Most casual users will not experience this condition. The condition is resolved by removing and re-inserting the ThumbDV™ into the USB port.  Linux and Microsoft Windows sleep state does not exhibit this condition.  Since FTDI USB drivers are not written by NW Digital Radio, buyers of the ThumbDV™ should consider this when making a purchase decision.

All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on the site are the property of their respective owners, including in some instances NW Digital Radio. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved.

 

UDRX does Raspberry Pi 2

We have moved from our custom linux SBC to the Raspberry Pi 2. This has a number of advantages:

  • Higher Performance
  • Lower Cost
  • Better Software Support
  • Easier for Developers to migrate SW to the UDRX
  • Future processor migration path, assuming header pinout compatibility

Of course nothing comes for free and there has been additional SW work migrating from a 3.x to 4.x kernel. Packaging has also been affected, but the overall package is simpler and better for final assembly. We are testing now using our existing RF Deck and a 40 pin adapter cable.

Existing SBC

Existing SBC

 

SBC VS R Pi 2

SBC VS R Pi 2

 

40 Pin Remapping Header

40 Pin Remapping Header

 

Test Configuration with Optional Paper Clip

Test Configuration

We are engaging with a Contract Manufacturer for Turn-Key Production, including custom extrusions. Engineering is moving forward towards a pilot run, once the Pi2+RF Deck is qualified at full power.

Expect the next update in January

Jeremy McDermond joins NW Digital Radio

Jeremy McDermond, NH6Z, has joined our team.  Jeremy is Vice President and a member of the board of directors of TAPR (www.tapr.org) and well known in the amateur community for his work with Software Defined Radio (SDR). He is author of Heterodyne, a software defined radio application for MacOS X and iOS devices supporting the OpenHPSDR (www.openhpsdr.org) project hardware.  Jeremy’s latest creation is Buster, a recently released application supporting the ThumbDV and PiDV on MacOS X.

You may have seen Jeremy speak at a variety of conferences including Dayton Hamvention, MicroHAMS digital conference and TAPR/ARRL Digital Communications Conference.  He has been active in the Summits on the Air (www.sota.org.uk) hiking to the tops of many mountains in the Northwest United States to make QSOs with his trusty KX3.  He also operates the T2OREGON APRS-IS server.

When not immersed in ham radio, Jeremy serves as Network Engineer for a small web hosting provider in Corvallis, OR and has been a UNIX systems engineer for nearly 20 years.  He is also a member of the Oregon State Bar Association and practices law in a variety of fields.

We are excited about adding Jeremy’s skills to the team and look forward to his contribution to the UDRX and other products.