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UDRC™ Install for Yaesu DR-1X

We have just published the Instructions at
UDRC™ install for DR-1X Wiki Page

Hamvention® 2016 – UDRC Rollout

Members of the NW Digital Radio team just returned from Hamvention® 2016 in Dayton, OH.

We had a Yaesu DR-1X repeater setup on 440+ running System Fusion Digital, Analog FM, and D-STAR using the UDRC in conjunction with the DR-1X’s internal controller.

The booth is located very close to the exit of the main Yaesu booth and a lot of folks passing by noticed the repeater and when the functionality was shown, most who owned a DR-1X immediately purchased one or more UDRCs.

Xastir + Direwolf were also demonstrated using a FT-817 transceiver and UDRC board.  This combination can be configured and operated at either 1200 or 9600 baud packet.

Software and instructions for the UDRC will roll out in the next few days.  It was necessary to repackage the Compass extension to Raspbian due to changes made by the Raspbian development team.  All users of the UDRC need to use the Compass distribution as their operating system to support the necessary drivers.  The code will be available as open source via Github for those interested in the enhancements.  Also, please use the Compass distribution for dstarrepeater package if using the UDRC for D-STAR either as a hotspot or as part of a repeater.

More to come in the coming days and weeks.

We would especially like to thank our UDRC beta testing team for valuable field experience and feedback.

UDRC: The Linux in the Ham Shack Interview

The good folks at the Linux in the Ham Shack podcast interviewed John (K7VE) about the UDRC and other topics.

The segment starts at minute 16:30 of podcast #166

A Short UDRX and UDRC Update from MicroHAMS 2016

John Speaks at DCC 2015

Bryan Speaks at DCC 2015

Putting AMBEserver on the Internet

If you have a low latency and responsive Internet connection, you can place an AMBEserver directly on the Internet and access it remotely through Buster, DummyRepeater, or any other program that provides AMBEserver connectivity.

Raspberry Pi with PiDV and ThumbDV

Raspberry Pi with PiDV and ThumbDV

The first step is to connect a PiDV™ to the GPIO of a Raspberry Pi or a ThumbDV™ to the USB port of a computer which will run the AMBEserver.  A Raspberry Pi is more than sufficient for this task and provides an economical platform for AMBEserver, however, the choice of computer is up to you.  Follow the directions on this page for a Raspberry Pi build and configuration.

Once you have built your AMBEserver, verify that it is working with the included Python scripts, ‘ambesocktest.py’ will test the UDP socket, it returns the AMBE-3000 model number repetitively until killed (with control-C) if the daemon is functioning properly on port 2460.

On your local network, configure Buster or DummyRepeater to access the AMBEserver on the LAN IP address of your AMBEserver. When you have a working AMBEserver, then it is time to make it available outside your LAN.

Picture of Buster Preferences

Buster Preferences for AMBEserver

DummyRepeater Select AMBEserver

DummyRepeater Preferences for AMBEserver

Since there are a variety of routers/firewalls/modems that connect you to your ISP it is beyond the scope of this article to provide specific instructions, but all that is required is to forward an external port (default 2460) on your public IP to the LAN IP address of your AMBEserver (e.g. 192.168.0.5) at the designated port (default 2460).  You may want to choose a different UDP port in your AMBEserver and for your public facing IP address.  If you use the same port for both, then you most likely can configure Buster or DummyRepeater once for use at home and away by using your public IP address (replace the LAN IP address or Localhost IP Address).

Now take your Buster or DummyRepeater system to a remote location and test accessing AMBEserver over the Internet using your public IP address.

Native MacOS Application for ThumbDV™ and PiDV™

 

 

Buster on App Store

 

Jeremy McDermond, NH6Z, undertook writing a native application for Mac OS® and it is now available on the  Mac App Store.

Buster is not a product of NW Digital Radio and support requests should go directly to Jeremy.

Jeremy has stated that the source code will be made publicly available via GitHub and he is open to collaboration for future versions.

It works with a ThumbDV™ on a Mac OS® USB port and with AMBEserver™, locally or over a network.  AMBEserver can support either the ThumbDV™ or PiDV™.

This application has been in beta for several months and is both stable and feature rich.  It takes advantage of several Mac OS® specific services.  For example, it will use Apple Core Location service to determine your current location and reports it via D-STAR.  It also provides mapping of remote stations who are reporting position.

There is one known issue:  The way that Mac OS® powers USB ports during its sleep state may cause communication issues with the the ThumbDV™ upon wake up.  Most casual users will not experience this condition. The condition is resolved by removing and re-inserting the ThumbDV™ into the USB port.  Linux and Microsoft Windows sleep state does not exhibit this condition.  Since FTDI USB drivers are not written by NW Digital Radio, buyers of the ThumbDV™ should consider this when making a purchase decision.

All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on the site are the property of their respective owners, including in some instances NW Digital Radio. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved.

 

FlexRadio Systems® and NW Digital Radio Offer D-STAR Compatible Solution

FlexRadio Systems®, the premier manufacturer of amateur radio SDR transceivers, will soon release an update to their SmartSDR™ software in support of the JARL’s D-STAR standard through installing the ThumbDV™ Waveform Module into SmartSDR™.

Owners of FLEX-6000™ Signature Series transceivers may add AMBE encoding/decoding to their radios by inserting the ThumbDV™ into one of the available USB ports.  Use of D-STAR digital voice mode will then be enabled through SmartSDR™ software.

“The partnership of NW Digital Radio and FlexRadio Systems forged at DCC last year has yielded a unique opportunity for FlexRadio owners to add the D-STAR mode to their FLEX-6000, as a component of our growing digital voice offerings.” said Steve Hicks, N5AC, VP Engineering for FlexRadio Systems®.

“It’s been great working with Flex to add D-STAR to their world class SDR and are excited about being a part of their ongoing development of digital voice modes.” said Bryan Hoyer, K7UDR, CEO of NW Digital Radio.

HF D-STAR is a growing mode with daily nets on all bands from 80-6 meters, as well as local VHF/UHF simplex and repeater networks.  For more information about HF D-STAR net operations please visit D-STAR HF Net

A real-time HF QSO finder can be found at HF D-STAR QSO Finder

The NW Digital Radio ThumbDV™ digital voice dongle will be available directly from FlexRadio Systems®, as well as from NW Digital Radio.

John Hays (K7VE) from NW Digital Radio and Steve Hicks (N5AC) from FlexRadio, will be available for questions, at the Huntsville Hamfest.

Press Contacts:
John Hays, Director, NW Digital Radio, k7ve@nwdigitalradio.com
Lori Hicks, Director Marketing Communications, FlexRadio Systems®, lori@flexradio.com


 

D-STAR is an open standard developed by the Japanese Amateur Radio League (JARL) under a grant from the Japanese Government
D-STAR is a wordmark of Icom Inc., in the United States and certain other countries.
AMBE-3000™ technology is developed and licensed by Digital Voice Systems Incorporated.
All other trademarks are registered to their respective owners.

Huntsville Hamfest

We won’t have a booth at Huntsville this year, but John Hays (K7VE) will be speaking at the D-STAR Innovations Forum on August 15th.

If you would like to visit with John be sure to catch him at the Huntsville Hamfest.